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Friday, August 18, 2017
About NWEA

NWEA offers computer-based assessments that adapt to the child in real-time while the test is in progress, and can be administered either online or through your local school district network. Reading, math, science and primary assessments are part of this system. The data you collect can help you in making informed instructional decisions; differentiating instruction to better meet student needs; grouping students for more focused or aligned instruction, and evaluating programs/curriculum for effectiveness.

 

Some Key Aspects of NWEA and Terms At A Glance

Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) – Tests administered by NWEA adjust to the student’s performance. The difficulty of each question is based upon how well the student has answered all of the questions prior to that point. As the student answers correctly, the questions will progressively become more difficult. If the student answers incorrectly, the questions accordingly become less complex. There are two types of assessments: Survey w/ Goals and Survey. NWEA uses a RIT scale to measure a student’s academic growth over time (see term for RIT below).

  •          MAP for Primary Grades Screening Assessments – Diagnostic assessments with results reported in both as a percentage and a numerical score; provides baseline information on foundational numeracy and literacy skills
  •          MAP for Primary Grades Skills Checklist Assessments – Diagnostic assessments with results reported both as a percentage and a numerical score; extends student assessment beyond the screening tests and are used to inform instruction and evaluate the attainment of foundational skills in academics and reading
  •          MAP for Primary Grades Survey with Goals Assessments – Adaptive assessments in reading and mathematics with results reported in RIT. .

The Children's Progress Academic Assessment (CPAA) is an interim, computer-adapted assessment of early literacy and mathematics skills. It is available for Pre K – Grade 3 in English and Pre K – Grade 2 in Spanish. This assessment generates instant reports aligned to both the Common Core and State standards, enabling teachers to move quickly from assessment to instruction, and assists administrators in identifying resource needs. CPAA reports include tools that identify skill gaps, group students for differentiation, plan instructional next steps and facilitate effective communication with parents.

Features of MAP Assessments

  •         Challenging, appropriate, and dynamic
  •         Immediate results
  •         Untimed
  •         Accurate data
  •         Measures of growth
  •         Frequency of testing

Uses  of Data From MAP Tests

  •        Identifying voids
  •        Monitoring progress and programs
  •        Conferencing
  •        Making informed instructional decisions

Types of Assessments With the MAP System

Survey w/ Goals – Longer test (between 42 – 62 questions) and is the primary test given in the fall and the spring.

  •         42 – 64 questions
  •         Overall score for subject
  •         Goal are scores
  •         Average time for each test – 50 minutes

Survey – (No goals) Shorter test (20 items) that will survey the domain of a subject area. This test will only report an overall RIT score at the end. Usually given when a student enters the district or as a monitoring tool..

  •          20 questions
  •          Overall score for each subject
  •          No goal area scores
  •          Average time for each test – 20 minutes

 

RIT Scale (Rasch Unit) – The RIT scale is used to measure a student’s academic growth over time. The scale is divided into equal intervals call RASCH UNITS (RIT). Units are independent of grade level. The RIT score relates directly to the curriculum scale in each subject area. RIT scores range from 100-300 and make it possible to follow a student’s educational growth from year to year.

.Characteristics of the RIT Scale:

  •          Achievement scale
  •          Equal-interval scale
  •          Used to show growth over time
  •          Independent of grade level

Conditional Growth Index (CGI) - a normative growth metric that was re-introduced in the 2011 NWEA RIT Scale Norms Study. This metric shows how student growth compares to the growth of students across the nation, and allows growth comparisons between students performing at different points on the achievement distribution, and across different grades and subject areas.

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Commonly Used NWEA Reports

Student Progress Reports – Helps teachers identify academic growth and parents become more engaged in the child’s learning over time.  These reports are useful for:

  • Classroom Instruction Planning
  • Monitoring Student Growth
  • Monitoring Student Achievement
  • Analyzing District Performance
  • School Improvement Planning.

Grade Level, Building Level and Classroom Growth Reports – Allow teachers and administrators to see a group of students at a glance and the group’s longitudinal results. You can also use these reports to compare other students in the class.  These reports are useful for:.

  • Classroom Instruction Planning 
  • Monitoring Student Growth
  •  Monitoring Student Achievement
  • Analyzing District Performance
  • School Improvement Planning.

District Summary Reports – Allow school administrators to see areas of strength and areas that need improvement. These reports can also be used to show performance in all of the schools or grade levels within a district.  These reports are useful for: .

  • Monitoring Student Achievement
  • Analyzing District Performance
  • School Improvement Planning.

The Children's Progress Academic Assessment (CPAA) is an interim, computer adaptive assessment of early literacy and mathematics skills. It is available for Pre K – Grade 3 in English and Pre K – Grade 2 in Spanish. It generates instant reports aligned to Common Core and state standards to help teachers move quickly from assessment to instruction and help administrators identify resource needs. CPAA reports include tools to pinpoint skill gaps, group students for differentiation, plan instructional next steps and communicate with parents.



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